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    Birmingham in cats crisis as pets abandoned and wild animals breed

    NewsCat Rescue NewsThursday 17 May 2012
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    TED, the loveable tabby, has used most of his nine lives after being discovered, panic stricken on a busy Small Heath road.

    He’d survived – just – on the streets by scavaging from discarded burger boxes. South Birmingham Cats Protection took him in and are now looking for a loving home.

    He’s yet another casualty of the city’s growing cat crisis, with the wild moggie population in danger of spiralling out of control.

    The group, which covers an area stretching from Rubery to Knowle and Dorridge, is currently looking after 30 animals – the maximum it can handle – and there are another 85 waiting to be moved into pens.

    The recession has meant many householders can’t afford the cost of neutering their pets. Some are simply left behind when families move.

    Volunteer Di Wilson hopes, at least Ted’s tale will have a happy ending.

    “He was in an absolutely dreadful state when he was brought in,” said the 64-year-old. “We found him starving and trying to eat from an empty McDonald’s box.

    “This little chap is very loving and domesticated. We’ve given him lots of TLC and attention.”

    Di singled out Selly Oak and Bordesley Green as particular hotspots for feral cats. Often, residents’ kindness is adding to the problem. They leave food for growing colonies and fat, healthy cats breed more readily.

    “Just before Christmas we were called to a road in Edgbaston,” said Di, “where elderly people were feeding the cats. In one week we took 19 kittens, the next week we took 11. And that was just the kittens.”The group also rescued three kittens found in a cardboard box, fished from a Perry Barr pond.

    Di added: “Dumped cats are a real problem. People leave their homes and literally walk out on their cats.

    “One of our biggest problems is feral cat colonies and much of the funds raised are spent in trapping and neutering these in an attempt to reduce numbers.”

    The branch, which relies on donations, desperately needs a fundraising co-ordinator.

    Anyone interested in taking-up the post should email [email protected]

    * If you want to adopt a cat go to southbham.cats.org.uk and the helpline number is 0845 3711854.

    Source: Birmingham Mail

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